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Climate Change News Digest for 4/15/22

Updated: Oct 5

This digest provides a selection of recent news articles relating to climate change and other environmental issues. Click on the title to read the full article from its original source.


Donors Pledge $41 Million to Monitor Thawing Arctic Permafrost

By Henry Fountain (New York Times)

The six-year effort by climate scientists and policy experts aims to fill gaps in knowledge about planet-warming emissions and help affected communities in Alaska. Led by the Woodwell Climate Research Center, the 6-year, $41 million project will fill in gaps in monitoring across the Arctic of greenhouse gas emissions from thawing permafrost, currently a source of uncertainty in climate models. The project is financed by private donors.


We Are Wasting Time on These Climate Debates. The Next Steps are Clear.

By John Bistline, Inês Azevedo, Chris Bataille and Steven Davis (New York Times)

The IPCC report released last week offers hope for limiting global warming. But there is no time to waste. And wasted time includes time spent debating issues that divert us from our most important priorities right now. Unfortunately, debates about distant future decisions and future uncertainties are distracting advocates, policymakers, researchers and the public from their shared, near-term goals.


Talking About Climate Change Is Depressing. Does It Have To Be?

By Sydnee Thompson (BuzzFeed)

One of society’s greatest threats often instills fear and hopelessness in readers, but journalism can offer new possibilities through language use and framing. A 2021 study in the journal “Climate Change” found focusing on solutions was often better for engagement than trying to scare people into action. News stories that emphasize taking action tend to make people feel hopeful. Articles that highlight solutions are also viewed as more credible, and people are less resistant to them.


Sweden set to be world’s first country to target consumption-based emission cuts

By Sam Morgan (Climate Home News)

A deal between Sweden’s political parties positions the country to take responsibility for the carbon footprint of imported goods. Sweden’s political parties agreed on Thursday to include consumption-based emissions within its climate targets, making it the first country in the world to make the leap into the complex realm of overseas emissions reporting.


Putin’s war shows autocracies and fossil fuels go hand in hand. Here’s how to tackle both

By Bill McKibben (The Guardian)

Democracies are making more progress than autocracies when it comes to climate action. But divestment campaigns can put pressure on the most recalcitrant of political leaders.


About the Digest: Articles included here are selected from several organizations which consolidate climate change related news from many sources around the world. These organizations include Carbon Brief and Inside Climate News. Accessing the full articles from the links provided here may sometimes not be possible due to access restrictions of the originating publications.



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